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More Industrial Engineering Schools in US

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Arizona State University

Auburn University

Binghamton University

Boston University

Cal Poly–San Luis Obispo

California State Polytechnic University–Pomona

California State University–Los Angeles

California State University–Northridge

Clemson University

Columbia University (Fu Foundation)

Cornell University

CUNY–City College

Dartmouth College (Thayer)

Florida Atlantic University

Florida State University/Florida A&M University

George Mason University

George Washington University

Georgia Institute of Technology

Howard University

Illinois Institute of Technology

Indiana University-Purdue University–Indianapolis

Iowa State University

Kansas State University

Kettering University

Lamar University

Lawrence Technological University

Lehigh University

Louisiana State University–Baton Rouge

Louisiana Tech University

Loyola Mary Mount University

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Mississippi State University

Montana State University

National Technological University

New Jersey Institute of Technology

New Mexico State University

New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University

North Carolina A&T State University

North Carolina State University

North Dakota State University

Northeastern University

Northwestern University

Oakland University

Ohio State University

Ohio University

Oklahoma State University

Oregon Graduate Inst. of Science and Technology

Oregon State University

Penn State University–University Park

Polytechnic University

Portland State University

Prairie View A&M University

Purdue University–West Lafayette

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Rutgers State University–New Brunswick

San Jose State University

South Dakota School of Mines and Technology

South Dakota State University

Southern Methodist University

Stanford University

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

SUNY–Stony Brook

Syracuse University

Tennessee State University

Tennessee Tech University

Texas A&M University–College Station

Texas A&M University–Kingsville

Texas Tech University

University at Buffalo

University of Alabama–Huntsville

University of Alabama–Tuscaloosa

University of Arizona

University of Arkansas

University of Bridgeport

University of California–Berkeley

University of California–Los Angeles

University of California–San Diego

University of Central Florida

University of Cincinnati

University of Connecticut

University of Dayton

University of Florida

University of Hartford

University of Houston

University of Illinois–Chicago

University of Illinois–Urbana-Champaign

University of Iowa

University of Kentucky

University of Louisville

University of Maryland–College Park

University of Massachusetts–Amherst

University of Massachusetts–Dartmouth

University of Massachusetts–Lowell

University of Memphis

University of Miami

University of Michigan–Ann Arbor

University of Michigan–Dearborn

University of Minnesota–Twin Cities

University of Missouri–Columbia

University of Missouri–Rolla

University of Nebraska–Lincoln

University of New Haven

University of New Mexico

University of North Carolina–Charlotte

University of Oklahoma

University of Pennsylvania

University of Pittsburgh

University of Rhode Island

University of South Florida

University of Southern California

University of Tennessee–Chattanooga

University of Tennessee–Knoxville

University of Texas–Arlington

University of Texas–Austin

University of Texas–El Paso

University of Toledo

University of Virginia

University of Washington

Utah State University

Virginia Tech

Wayne State University

Western Michigan University

Wichita State University

Widener University

Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Wright State University

Youngstown State University

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SAT & ACT Score Comparison

 

(To see the table click the headline of the article)

SAT & ACT Score Comparison

Here is how it is interpreted by

Princeton Review.

College Board (pdf)

Princeton Review Chart is given below:
The chart below contains comparative scores for three tests.
It is important to note that a student that scores well on the ACT is not guaranteed to have similar success on the SAT and vice versa. (Scores between the Current SAT and the New SAT should be consistent.)

For example, say a student earns an ACT composite score of 31; colleges will view this score as being in the same range of a 1360 – 1400 on the SAT.

But it does not mean the student will actually earn that score if he took the SAT. This relationship is merely a way of looking at the competitive equivalent of the two tests, and is not meant to be a predictor of student performance.

ACT
If you scored
Current SAT
or a
New SAT
it’s about the same as
36 1600 2400
35 1560-1590 2340
34 1510-1550 2260
33 1460-1500 2190
32 1410-1450 2130
31 1360-1400 2040
30 1320-1350 1980
29 1280-1310 1920
28 1240-1270 1860
27 1210-1230 1820
26 1170-1200 1760
25 1130-1160 1700
24 1090-1120 1650
23 1060-1080 1590
22 1020-1050 1530
21 980-1010 1500
20 940-970 1410
19 900-930 1350
18 860-890 1290
17 810-850 1210
16 760-800 1140
15 710-750 1060
14 660-700 1000
13 590-650 900

 

 

What Happens If My Undergraduate GPA Is Low?

Undergraduate GPA is the most common criterion used in admission, but it is not an infallible predictor of graduate success.

If you discover that your GPA is low, either in terms of being below the minimum required for admission, or low by comparison with other persons applying to a particular program, you need to find some ways to offset the lack of a high GPA. Since graduate programs often use multiple criteria for admission, this is not as difficult as it may seem at first. By gathering strong recommendation letters, scoring well on admissions tests, doing internships or post-baccalaureate employment in the field, you can offset the effect of a low GPA.

It is also appropriate to call attention to non-academic circumstances which may have prevented your GPA to accurately represent your capacity, so as to place your record in an appropriate context. If circumstances affected your performance, you can describe them and indicate what steps you have taken to overcome those circumstances. Such explanations can either be incorporated in your statement of purpose or written up as a separate statement to be included with your application form. The important thing is to phrase your explanation so that it does not sound like excuse-making. Having others read and critique your statement can be very helpful here.

If your GPA was the result of a learning disability or other such condition, you will have to decide whether or not to disclose the disability in explaining your academic performance. Federal law prohibits discrimination in admissions on the basis of disability. It is even illegal to require applicants to disclose disabilities on an application form. But many students feel that disclosing their disability in the admissions process places them at a disadvantage. I can’t argue that they are wrong.

I will say this: if you can show that, once your disability was identified and you began to receive necessary accommodations, your performance was much stronger than it previously was, or better yet equaled or exceeded the minimum required for admission, you have placed yourself in a strong position. If you show that reasonable accommodations put you on an equal footing with the other applicants to the program, the program can’t disqualify you on the basis of your disability.

For More on GPA also see :

Advice about low GPA

Secrets of Standing Out From the Pile: Getting Into Graduate School

Matthew T. Huss
If you are beginning the process of applying to graduate school this year, you are realizing it’s not easy. You are learning schools are looking for GRE scores of 800, a GPA of 4.5 on a 4.0 scale, at least two dozen publications, and a letter of recommendation from Sigmund Freud. Maybe not, but you probably have felt as if this were at least close to the truth at times. I had similar thoughts when I was just applying to PhD programs, especially after I didn’t get into a school the first time around. As a result of my first-time failure followed by my later success, I learned there were more factors involved in getting into graduate school than grades or GRE scores. I hope that what I have learned can help those of you just starting the process.
When people speak of the keys to getting into graduate school, GRE scores and grades are usually the focus. They are usually seen as first-order criteria. They are referred to as first-order criteria because schools often look at these particular aspects of an application first. While this is true, and the importance of such criteria cannot be overemphasized, they are simply screening mechanisms for most schools. Schools have certain minimums or average scores they have found are characteristic of successful students. If programs advertise that their students’ average GRE scores are about 650 and their average GPA is 3.75, realize these are only averages. There are students who were accepted with 800s and 4.0s, but there are also students who were accepted with 550s and 3.3 grade point averages.
Depending on the area, a graduate program may receive anywhere from 50 to 500 applications in any given year. Most of these applicants are going to have high GRE scores and good grades or they wouldn’t be applying to graduate school. All of these applications are going to be thrown into the pile. As long as your scores are around these averages, you can stay in the running. You can stay in that pile. The longer you stay in the pile, the better your chances are of getting into the school. If you have the basic credentials, the things that enable you to stick out from the rest of the applicants are going to get you admitted into the program.
One of the best ways to stand out from the rest of the pile is research, research, research! Most graduate programs are at large universities where faculty are under pressure to publish. Prospective applicants who have demonstrated they are capable of undertaking research projects and have acquired a number of research skills are very attractive to a program. These are skills faculty members won’t have to spend time teaching a new student.

Click to Read the Article 

Understanding GPA

If you follow the narration given below as to how USA universities go about calculating GPA. You will get a better idea about your own academics.

In the US, universities use a purely statistical way of measuring progress.
Each of the courses a student takes in a term is worth a number of “units” or “credits”.
Most are worth three units.
These are graded A, B, C, D or fail.
An    A gets four points
a       B three
a      C two
a      D one
and a failure none

Averages

Universities multiply the number of units by the grade number.
So, an A for a three-unit course is worth 12 points.
A -B is worth 9 points
A -C is of 6 points
and a D is 3 points
At the end of the term, they divide the number of accumulated grade points by the number of units to get a student\’s Grade Point Average (GPA).
For instance, someone might accumulate nine unit points in a term and get 24 points (an A and two Cs).
Divide the points (24) by the units (9) and you get a GPA of 2.67 – just below a B (3) equivalent.
The average is worked out term-by-term and a rolling average ends in a final GPA at the finish of the degree course.
Employers get a more exact idea of where job candidates stand when they look at the final grade.
However, whether a couple of hundredths of a point would make that much difference is debatable.
US students tend to specialize less early on than their overseas counterparts.
So, transcripts of performances in all exams taken during a course are also available.
An employer might use these to pick and choose particular relevant skills – such as a manufacturer who cares more about units in chemistry than English literature.
The GPA undoubtedly gives a “purer” version of a student’s overall progress, but even in the US there have been accusations of grade inflation.

These Links may  also be of interest to you:

Low GPA Stories

About GPA and Class Position

More on GPA

What Happens if my undergraduate GPA is low?

Grade Point Average and Admissions

How to convert percentage marks to the GPA system? Part 1

Advice on Low GPA