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Graduate Schools With Largest Number of International Students

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Institution

City

State

Total International Students

Total Enrollment

Proportion

City University of New York Baruch College

New York

NY

3,043

15,423

19.7%

San Francisco State U

San Francisco

CA

2,566

26,804

9.6%

California State U at Long Beach

Long Beach

CA

2,266

33,259

6.8%

U of Texas at El Paso

El Paso

TX

2,054

16,220

12.7%

Hawaii Pacific U

Honolulu

HI

1,851

8,033

23.0%

U of Bridgeport

Bridgeport

CT

1,594

3,313

48.1%

U of Central Oklahoma

Edmond

OK

1,522

14,564

10.5%

California State U at Hayward

Hayward

CA

1,480

13,487

11.0%

City University of New York City College

New York

NY

1,475

11,136

13.2%

San Jose State U

San Jose

CA

1,471

27,000

5.4%

Rochester Institute of Technology

Rochester

NY

1,433

15,160

9.5%

California State U at Fullerton

Fullerton

CA

1,350

29,000

4.7%

Eastern Michigan U

Ypsilanti

MI

1,304

24,287

5.4%

California State U – Northridge

Northridge

CA

1,264

29,066

4.3%

Strayer College (DC)

Washington

DC

1,204

14,009

8.6%

U of Nevada at Las Vegas

Las Vegas

NV

1,198

23,618

5.1%

D’Youville College

Buffalo

NY

1,122

2,486

45.1%

New York Institute of Technology Main Campus – Old Westbury

Old Westbury

NY

1,016

9,456

10.7%

Oklahoma City U

Oklahoma City

OK

1,016

3,705

27.4%

California State Polytechnic U at Pomona

Pomona

CA

1,016

19,041

5.3%

Fairleigh Dickinson U

Teaneck

NJ

960

9,684

9.9%

U of North Carolina at Charlotte

Charlotte

NC

958

18,000

5.3%

City University of New York Brooklyn College

Brooklyn

NY

951

15,039

6.3%

Saint Cloud State U

St. Cloud

MN

918

15,181

6.0%

U of Massachusetts at Boston

Boston

MA

873

12,000

7.3%

U of South Alabama

Mobile

AL

868

11,673

7.4%

Golden Gate U

San Francisco

CA

831

4,810

17.3%

California State U at Los Angeles

Los Angeles

CA

817

19,593

4.2%

Montclair State U

Upper Montclair

NJ

814

13,855

5.9%

California State U at Fresno

Fresno

CA

768

20,013

3.8%

U of Nebraska at Omaha

Omaha

NE

760

15,106

5.0%

Towson U

Towson

MD

740

16,729

4.4%

City University of New York Hunter College

New York

NY

738

20,149

3.7%

California State U at Sacramento

Sacramento

CA

724

26,924

2.7%

California State U at San Bernardino

San Bernardino

CA

695

695

100.0%

Santa Clara U

Santa Clara

CA

693

7,592

9.1%

Suffolk U

Boston

MA

685

5,314

12.9%

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical U

Daytona Beach

FL

669

4,803

13.9%

U of Texas – Pan American

Edinburg

TX

661

13,640

4.8%

U of Houston at Clear Lake

Houston

TX

616

7,738

8.0%

 

 

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Indian Student Associations In United States

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Indian Students Associations are very helpful. You may contact them for landing facilities, pickup from the airports and initial stay on reaching the universities.

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UK – International student fees ‘overpriced’

The UK is in danger of losing precious international students by universities pricing themselves out of the market, the Higher Education Policy Institute warned today.
According to Hepi’s latest report on the economic benefits of international students, the UK’s market share of such students is still second only to the US, but it dropped to around 11% in 2004 from 16% in 1998.

Bahram Bekhradnia, director of Hepi, told EducationGuardian.co.uk: “There is a real possibility that we may price ourselves out of the market – last year’s Hepi survey of the student experience showed that over 25% of overseas students think they get poor value for money.

“It could well be in the national interest to lower the fee charged of overseas students, in order to maximise their number.”

While the actual number of international students in the UK is increasing overall, the report said universities should not presume this would continue.

As other countries begin to teach in English and market themselves more aggressively, and students get better information to compare the value for money of courses “it is quite possible that UK universities will begin to struggle to maintain numbers while charging the sorts of prices that are charged at present”, the report warns.

Hepi argues for the government to subsidise international students to maximise their numbers and “provide the greatest benefit to the country as a whole, looking beyond the narrow interests of universities”.

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New Option for Foreign Interns

After years of lobbying on the part of international education leaders, the Department of State posted a proposed change to its J-1 exchange visitor regulations Tuesday that would create a new subcategory specifically for student interns.

“The question is, what happens if a student who is enrolled in a foreign institution of higher education wants to pursue an internship at a U.S. institution of higher education or an affiliated organization like a research institute as part of their studies,” said Victor C. Johnson, associate executive director for public policy at NAFSA: Association of International Educators, which has advocated for such a change for six or seven years now.

“At the current time, it’s not that it’s impossible to do that, but there’s no category in the regulations that applies to those people. So they’ve had to be shoehorned in under other regulatory categories that weren’t created to apply to interns.”

Under the proposed change, foreign students enrolled in accredited postsecondary institutions outside of the United States, or graduates who have completed a program of study within 12 months of starting an exchange, would be eligible to participate in one year-long internship program per degree level. Potential international interns must be able to describe how the internship — which can be paid or unpaid — would enhance their educational programs in their home institutions. The regulations prohibit sponsoring institutions from placing interns in unskilled or casual labor positions, or in those that involve aviation, child or elder care, and patient care or contact (including dentistry, early childhood education, nursing, psychological counseling, social work, speech therapy, sports or physical therapy, and veterinary medicine).

Several international educators said they were still reviewing the proposed rules Tuesday. But overall they were pleased to see that a proposal — long delayed after September 11, Johnson said — was finally in play. “[I]n general this is an extremely positive and significant addition to the college and university student category of the J1 exchange visitor program,” Ann Kuhlman, director of Yale University’s Office of International Students and Scholars, said via e-mail Tuesday. “U.S. institutions of higher education have suggested this addition for the past few years — as we began to see an increase in requests from students, particularly from Europe and Asia, who were seeking internships in their fields at U.S. colleges and universities.”

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Australia targets UK students

Three years ago, William Sheane turned down a place at King’s College London to study maths and management. Instead, Sheane, originally from Oxford, “threw in” an application to the University of Sydney. “I was over the UK student lifestyle of getting smashed,” he says. “I’d spent five years working in bars, beaches and diving centres. I thought it was a really good opportunity to go abroad, keep doing what I wanted, but also have a more serious side to my life. I thought I’d see what happened.”

Now, at 26, with a degree in economics behind him and an honours degree – equivalent to a year of research and a thesis – on the way, he has no regrets. At least, none that come to mind as he walks to class after a quick surf, something he does almost every day.

Natasha Krichefski, 22, from London, is spending a year at the University of New South Wales as part of her Edinburgh University undergraduate music degree. “A masters out here has great appeal,” she says. “I’m seriously considering music therapy at the University of Western Sydney, although an equivalent course is also offered in London.”

In the first semester of 2006, there were 1,801 UK students like Sheane and Krichefski on undergraduate, postgraduate or exchange programmes in Australian universities. This is peanuts compared with the numbers of students from China (40,292), Malaysia (24,952) and Singapore (20,714). But Australian universities are paying more attention than might be expected to their UK student numbers.

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So What Did You Learn in London?

With assessment and accountability at the center of policy discussions in Washington and elsewhere, international educators emphasized an increased need for research on measurable study abroad outcomes and what particular program characteristics cause student learning gains at several sessions during this week’s annual NAFSA: Association of International Educators conference in Minneapolis.
“It is no longer a fringe activity,” with more than 200,000 American college students going abroad each year and new federal funding initiatives for international study, Richard C. Sutton, senior advisor for academic affairs and director of international programs for the University System of Georgia Board of Regents said Wednesday afternoon. “But that money will not be free. It will come at the price of accountability and assessment measures.”
In a session on “Changes That Occur Abroad,” Sutton highlighted Georgia’s systemwide research of study abroad outcomes, the Georgia Learning Outcomes of Students Studying Abroad Research Initiative (or GLOSSARI). The ambitious six-phase, six-year-old project covers a lot of ground, including:
1.Comparing learning outcomes of study abroad participants with those of their peers who stay stateside.
2.Tracking learning outcomes of study abroad participants by administering pre- and post-tests.
3.Comparing the experiences and learning of students taking a particular course abroad versus those taking that same course at home.
4.Performing a statistical analysis on graduation and persistence rates relative to study abroad participation.
5.Identifying and conducting case studies on study abroad programs that produce strong results in student learning.

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Understanding and Engaging the International Student

In a session on “Understanding and Engaging the International Student,” representatives from Hobsons, a student recruitment and enrollment management firm, presented data from a 2006 survey of about 28,000 prospective international students worldwide. The survey looks at such questions as why students wish to study abroad, their perceptions of various English-speaking destinations and why some appeal more than others, their expectations, and their key concerns.

The landscape for recruiting and retaining international students is changing, said Line Verbik, research manager at Hobsons. Given changes in student mobility — Verbik pointed to declines in international student enrollment in the United States post September 11 and the slowing of growth in international enrollments in the United Kingdom and Australia in recent years — presenters stressed the need to have greater information about prospective students’ decision-making processes and the factors they consider.

Not surprisingly, the Hobsons survey found commonalities among international students from around the globe, as well as some country-specific distinctions. Among the highlights presented Tuesday, which focused exclusively on the approximately 11,000 survey responders from China, Germany, India, Japan and Nigeria:

When asked their reasons for wanting to study internationally, students across the board emphasized improving their opportunities for careers abroad and gaining experiences and better preparing for future careers in their home countries, as well as a sense that the standard of education is better abroad. But Verbik pointed out that students from countries with developed and less developed economies had different priorities: While students in Germany and Japan were most likely to list gaining new experiences as their top priority, Chinese, Indian and Nigerian students were more likely to stress getting a better education and preparing for their careers.
When it comes to perceptions, international students typically cited the strength of the education system and career preparation as top reasons to study in the United States and United Kingdom. While they mentioned Australia’s academic reputation, they were also more likely to point to other factors drawing them there — among them a more attractive lifestyle and the belief that it’s easier to get a student visa to study down under than in Europe or the United States, Verbik said.
Business and administration programs proved particularly popular with international students across the board. Information technology and engineering were especially popular with Indian and Nigerian students, whereas in Japan, for instance, social studies and art and design were the preferred fields after business.
Frequently cited expectations for education providers across countries included a safe location, responsive staff and good service, good sources of funding, good facilities and a strong institutional reputation for a course of study, although regional variations did persist. (Among them: German and Nigerian students were most likely to cite good facilities as the most important factor, while Chinese students pointed to reputation).
Chinese and Indian students said scholarships were their most important source of funding, while German, Japanese and Nigerian students pointed in greater proportions to relatives. Other popular sources of funding included bank loans (particularly popular in India, Verbik said), grants, sponsorships, savings and part-time work.
Confirming the conventional wisdom that word of mouth matters most, Hobsons found that in every country but Japan, friends were the most valued source of advice. In Japan, the teacher/lecturer was the preferred source (and in Germany, the teacher tied with friends for the top spot). Students returning home with stellar experiences are, Verbik said, “the best ambassadors.”
The cost of living and cost of tuition and fees were the most common barriers expressed in all countries, with concerns about visas cited by a much smaller proportion of students, Verbik said (although Nigerian students were most apt to mention visas as a barrier).
Steve Berridge, director of the international education office at the University of Westminster, in London (which has 6,000 international students), praised the Hobsons survey results for offering valuable information on prospective international students, while emphasizing the difficulty of reading the results in context. He added the caveat that a survey of interest among prospective students may not always signal market demand. For instance, Hobsons found that Nigerian students were far more interested in pursuing undergraduate study abroad. “I know for a fact,” Berridge said, “that Nigeria is a postgraduate market.”

The NAFSA conference, with sessions and plenary addresses on a wide variety of topics involving international students and study abroad, continues through Friday. More than 7,000 participants from 90 countries are expected to attend.

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